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MARRCH Annual Conference | Agenda
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2019 MARRCH Annual Conference | Agenda

October 28-30, 2019 | Saint Paul RiverCentre | 175 W Kellogg Blvd

 

Jump to: MONDAY | TUESDAY | WEDNESDAY | conference central


Monday, October 28

7:00 am - 3:00 pm

Registration


8:00 - 9:00 am

FEATURED SPEAKER | Chuck Ingoglia

More Info


Personalized Care – The Promise of an Integrated Behavioral Health System

Chuck Ingoglia, President/CEO of the National Council for Behavioral Health

 


9:00 - 9:30 am

Break & Exhibit Hall Viewing


9:30 - 11:30 am

Breakout Sessions

Session Info

Treatment Coordination | Core Function: Treatment Planning

Karen Edens, Edens Group Training Center

Treatment Coordination, a specialized Substance Use Disorder service, is a cornerstone of the Minnesota Substance Use Disorder Reform.  Treatment Coordination brings together providers and resources to integrate behavioral health care, client needs and recovery  Effective implementation of Treatment Coordination results in provider efficiency, improved clinical outcomes, efficient cost-containment and increased client satisfaction.

Objectives:

  1. Define Treatment Coordination and its benefits in the context of a specialized SUD service
  2. Identify the provider skills needed to implement Treatment Coordination
  3. Document improved referrals, enhanced quality of care and client satisfaction

Building Resiliency for Clients with Mental Health, Cognitive and Substance Use Disorders | Core Function: Human Diversity

Rick Kruger, Vinland National Center

Be resilient. The presentation focuses on helping individuals facing mental health, cognitive, and substance use disorders to improve their chances for successfully handling life's stresses and lowering the possibility of relapse. Resiliency is defined as the person's ability to bounce back from stressful life events. The presentation includes how to help clients' lower their symptoms by increasing internal and external protective factors. How to lower the demands clients have in their lives and increase their available resources and their ability to be resilient. 

Objectives:

  1. Learn definitions of resiliency as it relates to individuals with co-occurring disorders.
  2. Define internal versus external risk and protective factors in resiliency
  3. Describe the concept of an individual's demands vs. resources in meeting life's challenges

Justice Served Juveniles | Core Function: Human Diversity

Melissa McCann, Minnesota Corrections Association; Carter Diers, Minnesota Corrections Association; Jane Schmid, Brown County Probation

Have you ever wondered what happens when a juvenile commits a crime and is arrested? This training will focus on what happens from the moment a juvenile is arrested to being placed on probation, to their reintegration back into the community successfully. We will focus on the assessments and services provided to juveniles while they are involved in the juvenile justice system and how we utilize these programs and services to help them become successful! 

Objectives:

  1. Participants will develop an understanding of juveniles who are justice involved and how they proceed through the system following an arrest.
  2. Participants will gain knowledge of the variety of services that a juvenile can access while on probation or in a residential setting. 
  3. Participants will have an understanding of the screening and assessment processes and how they impact the services provided to the juvenile. 

Beyond Trauma - The Biology of Shame and Thriving | Core Function: MACMHP

Tyler Reitzner, Thriver Institute

This presentation weaves psychological research and neuroscience with Tyler Reitzner's experiences of developmental trauma from childhood to adulthood. Joining trauma-informed theory with real-life examples, Tyler's work will take you beyond the diagnosis and into the human experience.  This workshop will give attendees a baseline to start moving from trauma-informed and ACEs research to practical trauma-responsive action steps.  The workshop will also give them clear direction on how to deal with stress, burn out, and primary as well as secondary trauma.  Attendees will get a deeper understanding of the power connection has in our lives and how trauma can impact our ability to connect. 

 

Suicide Assessment and Intervention | Core Function: Crisis Intervention & Counseling

Rebecca Revier & Alyson Lopez, MN Adult & Teen Challenge

Suicide is the 8th leading cause of death in Minnesota, and individuals with a substance use disorder are 6 times more likely to complete suicide then the general population. Despite ample research, suicidality remains one of the most elusive and difficult to address issues in the treatment of addictions. This presentation will explore the latest research, then bridge this research to best practice with clients, families, and communities. 

Objectives:

  1. Recognize warning signs and risk factors
  2. Basic intervention skills
  3. Ethical and legal considerations

Best Practices and Ethical Decision Making While Working with Self Injurious Behavior and Suicidality in Co-Occurring Settings | Core Function: Ethics

Charles Schutt, Building Bridges; Tim Gregory, Progress Valley

SUD and certain mental health diagnoses are linked to increased instances of suicidality, here defined as suicidal ideation, suicidal behavior, and/or self-injurious behavior. Awareness of best practices and possible complications is critical for effective care. This presentation will detail critical knowledge for engaging suicidal clients, application of an ethical decision making model, and effective methods of managing symptoms.

Objectives:

  1. Gain knowledge of connection between co-occurring disorders and suicidality.
  2. Participants will learn interventions for working with high-risk individuals
  3. Participants will build an understanding of the ethical dilemmas inherent in working with clients at high risk for suicide.

Spirituality, Science, and Addiction Treatment | Core Function: Counseling

Saul Selby, MN Adult & Teen Challenge

Spirituality & Religion have been scientifically demonstrated to have a positive impact on addiction treatment outcomes.  This session will explore the empirical evidence of Spirituality and Recovery and help participants learn and apply clinical interventions designed to support relapse prevention through spiritual growth. 

Objectives:

  1. Learn historical development of Spirituality in the field of Addiction
  2. Learn about research that demonstrates the positive impact of spirituality in addiction treatment
  3. Learn 3 Clinical Interventions that help clients engage Spirituality to reduce Relapse

 


11:30 am - 12:30 pm

Lunch


12:30 - 1:00 pm

Break & Exhibit Hall Viewing


1:00 - 2:30 pm

Breakout Sessions

Session Info

The Alcohol and Drug Counselor Workforce: New Data on the Profession | Core Function: Consulting with Other Professionals

Teri Fritsma Mogen, MN Department of Health

This session will take an in-depth look at the Alcohol and Drug Counselor workforce and profession in Minnesota. We will examine basic counts and demographics, as well as current supply and demand data that will help reveal which areas of the state are facing current and projected workforce shortages. We will also dig deeper into issues around work satisfaction. How satisfied are LADCs with their careers, and what drives satisfaction or dissatisfaction? 

Objectives:

  1. Attendees will learn more about their profession - who they are and where they are, and what they do.
  2. Attendees will understand more about the workforce supply and demand for alcohol and drug counselors.
  3. The session is intended to spark discussion about the work itself, and how to make it as satisfying and meaningful as possible

Game on!: the difference between play and pathology | Core Function: Cousneling Assessment

Justine Mastin, Blue Box Counseling and Wellness; Larisa Garski, Empowered Therapy

The term 'video game addiction' has become so ubiquitous as to be meaningless. In this presentation leading thinkers in the field of Geek Therapy will explore the power and importance of video games in the lives of gamers. What might appear to be excessive game-play is often more nuanced than it first appears, and may not in fact be pathology. Presenters will discuss how to connect with gamer clients to uncover the meaning of gaming in their lives, using narrative therapy techniques and new research in the field of therapeutic gaming to assess for potentially harmful gaming. Presenters will go on to explore the use of harm reduction techniques, particularly narrative therapy skills, to co-create goals with gaming clients. Presenters will spend ample time around the differential diagnosis of gaming disorder and allow time for reflection of attendees' own biases around gaming, gamers and geeks.

Objectives:

  1. Attendees will have a clear understanding of the gaming disorder diagnosis
  2. Attendees will have a clear understanding of their own feelings and biases around gamer clients
  3. Attendees will walk away with concrete harm reduction techniques, particularly narrative therapy skills, to use with gaming clients

Therapy via Telehealth: Ethical and Supervisory Considerations | Core Function: Ethics

Cindy Meyer, Northern Cities Therapy; Andria Botzet, Synergy eTherapy and UMN Department of Psychiatry

Online therapy (or internet-based services) is a fairly new approach in the counseling world; it can improve accessibility,  promote continuity of care, and increase patient comfort. However, these advantages must take into account the ethical considerations, especially in regards to the supervisory experience.  This presentation will provide an overview of telehealth services, highlight ethical considerations, and explore the role of telehealth from a supervisor's perspective.

Objectives:

  1. What is Telehealth?
  2. Ethical/HIPAA/Techology Considerations
  3. Clinical, Provider and Supervisory Considerations

A WIN-WIN Approach: Addressing Opioids and Tobacco Concurrently | Core Function: Treatment Planning

Melissa Mikkonen, People Incorporated; Christina Thill, MN Department of Health; Kerry Rose Toole, Avivo

While tobacco remains the leading of cause of death, opioid addiction has become a priority for treatment systems to address. In this session, we will explore the relationship between tobacco and opioids among the people who use them, effective strategies for meaningful patient engagement, and explain how patient engagement can help with the tobacco and growing opioid use crises. We will recognize the capacity for systems changes in Minnesota to increase success in addressing opioids and tobacco. (note to proposal reviewers: We are flexible about developing a session description that would fit your needs for a general session. We've worked with Tony Klein in other capacities; as an addiction counselor himself, he is skilled at engaging professionals to explore the topic.) 

Objectives:

  1. Describe current landscape related to opioid addiction and commercial tobacco use among adults and youth 
  2. Justify the concurrent treatment of opioid and tobacco addictions
  3. Demonstrate systems change for organizations to integrate tobacco treatment and opioid treatment and explore new resources

Ready or Not, Here They Come: People in Recovery Following Release From Prison | Core Function: Consulting with Other Professionals

Rebecca Ramsey & Jessica Sundberg, MN Department of Corrections

Approximately 9,000 individuals are currently incarcerated in MN state-operated correctional facilities.  Roughly 90% of the offenders currently incarcerated in a MN Correctional Facility meet DSM-V Criteria for a Substance Use Disorder.  About 95% of MN incarcerated offenders will return to their communities.  Despite ongoing and successful efforts to transition individuals from prison to the community, offenders continue to face significant barriers upon release.  This session will identify current MN Department of Corrections services available to help offenders with Substance Use Disorders transition from prison to the community.  Effective therapeutic interventions specific to this population will be addressed, along with how community services and resources can assist offenders as they transition from prison back to their communities.  

Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to learn about the Department of Corrections Substance Use Disorder Release Planning process, including Opioid Use Disorder interventions
  2. Participants will be able to identify specific skills/therapeutic interventions unique to this population
  3. Participants will be able to identify how and why community involvement and networking are key to successful reentry

Measuring Effective Group Therapy Practices in Co-Occurring Treatment | Core Function: Human Diversity - Co-Occuring

Kenneth Roberts & Lindssay Battuello, NUWAY

Group therapy is identified as an evidence-based modality for treatment of substance use and mental health disorders; it is a foundational component of many treatment programs. As the field continues to move towards a value-based care schema it is imperative that providers not only deliver effective interventions but be able to demonstrate client outcomes from these applications. With group services constituting a considerable percentage of the client experience, both providers and clients will benefit through implementation of standardized measurement practices to support quality care and outcomes. This session will provide a review of key group practice principles for clinicians along with strategies for supervisors and agencies to consider in implementing effective data gathering in a value-based care context.

Objectives:

  1. Attendees will be able to identify Yalom's key principles of group therapy
  2. Attendees will be able to differentiate between SAMHSA's five identified group models for SUD treatment
  3. Attendees will be able to assess specific tools and methods for measuring group therapy efficacy

Supporting Kids in Emotional Distress Using Developmental Repair | Core Function: Assessment, Counseling 

Lauren W. Nietz, Washburn Center for Children

This presentation is aimed at increasing the helping professional’s ability to recognize how and where a child is struggling, name it, and join the child in distress. By understanding the adverse experience that is underneath the behavior, a caring professional can better meet a child’s needs. Joining is a state of mind caring adults possess when they are attending to the needs of children, talking and acting for the benefit of the child, and is a means to getting “hired.”  It is an intentional relationship. Joining is at the core of helping children who have experienced early neglect, prolonged periods of destabilization, or trauma. Using our own reflective capacity as adults and language as a tool, caregivers can create helpful spaces for problems solving rather than power struggles.

Using lecture, case examples, and participant discussion this training allows participants to engage in a dynamic presentation about very complicated children. It is designed to help caring professionals gain new insights and intervention strategies. Those working with children will gain more skills to see and read what is underneath behavior and will feel more capable in meeting a child need.  

Objectives:

  1. an awareness of symptoms of traumatic stress as they present in children
  2. tools for staying reflective and in tune with the child and his or her experience
  3. “joining” language to name child’s internal experience
  4. ideas to help manage the adult’s internal and external dysregulation

 


2:30 - 3:00 pm

Break & Exhibit Hall Viewing


3:00 - 4:30 pm

Breakout Sessions

Session Info

Naloxone (Narcan) Training | Core Function: Crisis Intervention

Randy Anderson, Bold North Recovery and Counseling

These training sessions have been facilitated across the state of Minnesota and beyond. Training sessions have been held at large hospitals, treatment centers, universities, community centers, for first responders and for retail store security staff. We believe that everyone should learn how to recognize and reverse an opioid overdose. 

Objectives:

  1. What Naloxone (Narcan) is.
  2. How it works when administered.
  3. How to recognize the signs of an opioid overdose 

Registration of those who have a history of sex offending or kidnapping/false imprisonment in Minnesota: What is it? How does it work? | Core Function: Assessment, Referral, Consultation

Mark Blieven & Mark Collins, MN Department of Corrections

Residency restrictions continue to be a hot-button issue in Minnesota. Proponents believe these laws are important because they keep children safe and apart from those with a history of offending. However, a mountain of empirical evidence strongly suggests that residency restrictions have no effect on preventing sexual offending or mitigating sexual recidivism. This presentation provides an update on the ever-popular debate by examining the state of residency restrictions in Minnesota. 

Objectives:

  1. Why we have a system of registration.
  2. Who is subject to registration.
  3. What is the status of residency restrictions in Minnesota-based registration status.

The Wounded Griever: Grief Competency in Substance Use Disorder Counselors | Core Function: Treatment Planning

David Chastain, Hazelden Betty Ford Graduate School of Addiction Studies

The process of grief, the effects of various losses, and the understanding of and fears related to death are experiences that can complicate both the onset and maintenance of recovery. Whether providing support in the role of a counselor, coach, sponsor, teacher, friend or family member it is critical to be able to offer help when someone has experienced a difficult loss. This presentation addresses the skills that counselors and others need in order to effectively and meaningfully address issues associated with the grief process, the experience of loss, as well as the concepts and realities of death as experienced across the lifespan. Participants will examine how grief and loss are experienced in the contexts of both addictions and mental health. Participants will explore how personal conceptualizations of death interact with counseling dynamics and the experience of grieving. Participants will develop skills in assessing the role grief may play in the initiation of recovery and in the onset of relapse.  The moment when someone expresses that she has experienced a painful loss can be described as a window of opportunity. This expression of courage may only be present for a brief time. Counselors need to be prepared to offer help when the window of opportunity is opened. When counselors are unable or unwilling to help, that window may then close for a long time. 

Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to analyze how grief interacts with substance use, addiction recovery, and relapse
  2. Participants will be able to explain dynamics contributing to unexpressed or long-term grief
  3. Participants will be able to delineate the roles of resolution and acceptance in the grieving process.

Sleep Debt, Body Clocks and Behavioral Health | Core Function: Counseling

Michael DeSanctis, Positive Sleep Journeys

1. Didactic presentation enhanced by power point. The presentation will elucidate the basic neuro-biology of sleep and body clocks, identify sleep deprivation as a source of impaired decision-making, and as a predisposing or perpetuating factor in mental Illness and physical well-being. Chronic sleep debt will be viewed as a significant public health threat.  Seminar will highlight current cultural attitudes about sleep and discuss the respective interplay of light and darkness for optimal  functioning. The presentation will further offer an overview of pertinent basic and clinical research in sleep and chronobiology and translate that information into meaningful, everyday insights for behavioral health and chemical health clinicians/case managers to enhance care for their clients; Lecture format, with Q&A for 15-20 minutes following main presentation;  web-based and community  resources for sleep will be identified; 

Objectives:

  1. Describe basic human circadian chronotypes (Owl vs. Lark); demonstrate how to screen for chronotype in everyday mental health work and their relationship to personality traits and behavioral dispositions.
  2. Discuss the connection between insufficient sleep and behavioral risk factors, including substance use, falls, memory lapses, microsleeping,  suicide, drowsy driving and reduced academic/work performance.
  3. Review of  evidence-based solutions to remediate sleep debt and identifying the need for further consultation.

From Cultural Competence to Cultural Humility: A Paradigm Shift | Core Function: Ethics

Rashida Fisher & Antwan Player, Adler Graduate School

Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder professionals must go beyond simply recognizing difference in cultural norms. Professionals engaged in counseling must become increasingly self-aware of their worldviews and values and the worldviews and values of the client. This presentation offers counselors with information about cultivating the skills of practicing with cultural humility. Cultural humility in counseling goes beyond counselors having knowledge of specific cultural and minority groups with whom they work as described in traditional cultural competency frameworks. This presentation highlights the ethical responsibility of counselors to develop multicultural and social justice counseling competencies to effectively work with diverse individuals. Additionally, the session provides information necessary for the counselor to recognize the roles power, privilege, and oppression play in both the counseling relationship and delivery of clinical services. 

Objectives:

  1. Identify factors that can interfere in the counseling relationship between a clinician and clients of diverse cultural backgrounds, including issues related to oppression, privilege, and marginalization.
  2. Differentiate cultural humility and multicultural competency and explain cultural humility as an essential part of counseling, including core components and key considerations.
  3. Discuss the intersectional dimensions of diversity that include socioeconomic class, sexuality, gender identification, and dis/ability.

A Beginning Understanding of the Links between Trauma and Addiction | Core Function: Human Diversity - Co-Occuring

Tamarah Gehlen, StepUP at Augsburg University

This session will explore the connections between trauma and addiction and will look at the ACEs study as well as the neurobiological perspective of trauma, mental health and addiction.

Objectives:

  1. Understanding what trauma is, getting a clear definition and being able to explain this to clients
  2. Understanding how chronic stress and trauma can open up potentials for addiction
  3. Understanding the basics of epi-genetic factors on how traits express based on stress

 

De-escalation: Creating Connection in Crisis | Core Function: Crisis Intervention

Russ Turner, MA, MS, People Incorporated Training Institute

This session presents a neurobiological framework for understanding the nature of upset encounters and discusses common mistakes that people make in attempting to diffuse them. The intervention begins with “checking oneself” and establishing good control of the crucial elements of nonverbal communication. From there we examine and practice non-confrontational verbal responses that defuse the intensity of the interaction and promote safety.

Objectives:

  1. Learners distinguish de-escalation from problem solving and can explain the distinction using a simple neurological model
  2. Learners develop a paradigm for understanding the de-escalation process
  3. Learners improve some key elements of nonverbal communication
  4. Learners reflect and validate the upset person’s concern in place of reacting


 


4:30 - 5:30 pm

Breakout Sessions

Session Info

Narrative Therapy: The role of story development in ackowledging pain, affirming strength and cultivating hope among women in residential treatment. | Core Function: Human Diversity - Women

Bharati Acharya, AVIVO

In this short introduction to Narrative Therapy, participants will learn fundamental principles of Narrative Therapy, and how this post modern approach diverges from many traditional ideas of  Western psycho-therapeutic practice. Specifically, participants will learn how NT challenges notions of an " expert" curing,  or eradicating mental/ emotional distress  so that client personal/ social- relational agency can be highlighted. Finally, participants will learn 2-3 practical applications of Narrative therapy, to be used in their own contexts. 

Objectives:

  1. Participants will  learn the origins of Narrative Therapy and its philosophical foundations
  2. Participants will learn the fundamental tenets of Narrative Therapy
  3. Participants will learn 2 Narrative Therapy practices to apply in their own contexts

Don't Be Boring: Connecting Effectively with People in Early Recovery | Core Function: Counseling

Grady Arth & Mike Swenson, Beauterre Recovery Institute

Using PowerPoint visual aids and an interactive lecture, Grady Arth, LPCC, and Mike Swenson, LADC, will describe the basics of neuroscience related to early recovery, including the desensitization of the reward pathway that makes it difficult for those in early recovery to integrate new information, and enjoy themselves during groups and treatment interventions. Key components of learning is active engagement in the activity and the ability to recall the information over time. Presenting material in ways that induce emotion and excitement could enhance the engagement of the patient, and their ability to integrate and recall the information later. Attendees will practice challenging their own expectations of the 'rules of engagement' as well as receive activities and materials to conduct memorable, fun, and potentially more impactful individual and group therapy interventions in their own practices. 

Objectives:

  1. Attendees are familiarized with contemporary information about neuroscience related to early recovery in a graspable way, including the desensitization of the reward pathway 
  2. Attendees will practice challenging their own expectations of the 'rules of engagement' while responding to comments and actions in a group therapy environment.
  3. Attendees receive activities and materials to help them conduct more memorable group and individual interventions in their own practices.

Integrating Music into Standard Care for Individuals with Co-Occurring Disorders | Core Function: Human Diversity - Co-Occuring

Mark Collins, Vinland Center

The objective of this presentation is to demonstrate ways in which to integrate music into the treatment of clients with substance use disorders and/or mental health complications. The use of client music often increases rapport and helps expose deeper layers of a client's life. Our brains are like super computers-everything in our lives is stored within, and once you possess the right 'code' you are able access the information. Music is that code.       Music has been clinically proven to be effective in treating substance use and mental health disorders. Demonstrating strategies to help clients understand their emotions and behaviors through their own music, drumming, binaural beats, and clinician music in one-on-one and within group sessions is the focus of this presentation. Rhythm is the key to life, and individuals with addiction or co-occurring disorders are 'out of rhythm”. Helping them get back in the rhythm of life is critical to recovery.   Showing professionals how to use music for recovery, relapse prevention, emotional regulation, mindfulness, meditation, and sleep will give professionals another card in their deck.  

Objectives:

  1. Learn how to use Music in individual and group settings 
  2. Understand the role rhythm plays in recovery
  3. Learn about resources available 

Safety First: How to incorporate Trauma-informed treatment for co-occurring disorders within a residential and day treatment level of care setting | Core Function: Human Diversity - Co-Occuring

Princess Drake & Nicole Groschen, Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

This session seeks to provide additional resources and tools to promote safety and resiliency in early recovery. While individuals are working to gain the skills and tools to stay sober, they may have difficulty actively engaging in treatment because of historical or complex traumas. As a provider, being able to assess and recognize common signs and symptoms could be the difference between providing a safe environment or further interfering with treatment process. This would include a strength based and evidenced based approaches currently being utilized within the field.  At the end of the session, providers will have an overall better understanding of how to educate patients on the importance of trauma-informed approaches in residential and day treatment level of care. 

Objectives:

  1. Be able to recognize the implications of trauma while working with patients in residential and day treatment level of care. 
  2. Implications of historical and complex trauma experiences on early recovery and management of mental health. 
  3. Learn about evidenced based strategies and tools to explain to patients the difference between trauma informed versus trauma focused treatment and interventions.

Compassion Fatigue | Core Function: Ethics

Karen Edens, Edents Group Training Center

Compassion fatigue is characterized by an extreme, often traumatic state of tension and preoccupation resulting from repetitive exposure to the ongoing suffering presented by the clients we serve as helping professionals.  When compassion fatigue is addressed early in the helping process, stress and burn-out may be prevented.  When compassion fatigue is not acknowledged and addressed, the result may be potential ethical and practice compromises along with deteriorating client and professional self-care

Objectives:

  1. Differentiate compassion fatigue from stress overload and burn-out
  2. Describe the behaviors manifested by compassion fatigue
  3. Recognize the consequences of compassion fatigue on the helping relationship

The Pain and Fear Epidemic | Core Function: Counseling

Jessie Everts, Wayside Recovery Center

The opioid epidemic has come about not only because of over-prescribing and the lobbying of big Pharma, but also because of an increase in Americans' attention to and perhaps fear of experiencing pain - both physical and emotional. This session will talk about how this epidemic of pain and related fear has developed, interventions and possible solutions that incorporate understanding of co-occurring disorders and the psychology of addiction, fear, and pain.

Objectives:

  1. The audience will develop an understanding of the psychological precipitants of the opioid epidemic.
  2. The audience will recognize the interplay between psychological and physical symptoms and coping strategies.
  3. The audience will learn potential interventions for fear and pain through a co-occurring treatment lens.

Assessment and Treatment of Gambling Addiction within treatment programs | Core Function: Screening, Assessment

Tammy Reiff, Department of Veterans Affairs

This presentation will address Gambling as an Addiction.  Addiction treatment services commonly address drugs, alcohol, sex and spending addictions; however, few treatment programs address addiction to Gambling.  Gambling addition, although prevalent, is often overlooked and untreated.

Objectives:

  1. Participants will understand how to identify and diagnose Gambling Addiction.
  2. Participants will understand treatment options/therapy for Gambling Addiction.
  3. Participants will experience a case presentation identifying a Gambling Addict within a treatment setting. 

 


5:30 - 7:00 pm

EVENING EVENT | Community Connections – Reimagining Behavioral/Addiction Care

More Info


Featured Speaker:

We Are All Criminals

Emily Baxter

 


Tuesday, October 29

7:00 am - 3:00 pm

Registration


8:00 - 9:00 am

FEATURED SPEAKER | Mark Sanders

More Info


Trauma Informed Care – A Focus on Ethics and Cultural Competency

Mark Sanders, LCWS, CDAC – Author and International Speaker

 


9:00 - 9:30 am

Break & Exhibit Hall Viewing


9:30 - 11:30 am

Breakout Sessions

Session Info

Oxycontin With a Whiskey Chaser: Understanding and Addressing Substance Use Disorders and Related Comorbidities in Older Adult Populations | Core Function: Human Diversity - Older Adults

John Dyben, Origins Behavioral Healthcare

The demographic makeup of the US is changing with a shift towards a growing elderly population. With Baby Boomers moving into retirement, trends in substance abuse and addiction amongst older adults is increasing at alarming rates. Physical and mental health related comorbidities are common in this population and often contribute to confusion of the clinical presentation. This workshop will explore the unique issues of substance abuse and treatment as it relates to older adults. We will explore trends in aging, the unique effects of drugs (illicit, prescription, and alcohol) on the aging body, related comorbidities, and specific treatment needs of older adults who require clinical or medical intervention for any type of substance abuse or addiction. 

Objectives:

  1. Understand trends in aging, substance use disorders, and health care. 
  2. Improve knowledge of substance use disorders and related comorbidities in older adults.
  3. Describe the unique treatment needs of older adults and explain strategies for improved treatment outcomes. 

Implementing Feedback Informed Treatment within a Cultural Competence Framework in the Engagement of Emerging Adults with Co-Occurring Disorders | Core Function: Human Diversity - Adolescents

Fred Dyer, Hope Recovery Center

Emerging adults enter into SUD treatment from research more often with co-occurring disorders of mental illness and substance use disorders than not.  Implementing FIT starts at engagement with staff seeking actionable feedback, engagement in ongoing deliberate practice and tracking outcomes.  Therapeutic alliance is considered the SI NE QUA NON of clinical practice and is essential to obtaining feedback, data, and reaching clinical outcomes.  One major barrier in implementing FIT in the engaging of emerging adults with co-occurring disorders is the failure to embrace or operationalize cultural competence throughout.  The interfacing of engagement along with the practicing of cultural competence/humility lays the groundwork for the implementation of FIT which aids in the increase of retention/compliance, and completion rates.   

Objectives:

  1. Provide 9 reasons why counselors/therapist should utilize FIT in the engaging of emerging adults with co-occurring disorders within a cultural competence framework.
  2. Learn 6 benefits from research and clinical practice of FIT involving routine and formal measures in monitoring client progress in therapeutic alliance.
  3. Explain three steps to clinical excellence in utilizing FIT and how cultural competence/humility impacts on all three. — Know your baseline — Formal, routine, ongoing, feedback — Deliberate practice

The Third Dimension: Understanding the Intersection of Legal Barriers to Chemical and Mental Health | Core Function: Ethics

Tim Gregory, Progress Valley III

A drug counselor, a therapist, and a lawyer walk into a room, what happens? A panel discussing  the multiple factors involved in balancing legal responsibilities while one is attempting to heal  from emotional scars and recover from addictive chemicals. We bring three professions together  to educate participants on the unique challenges faced by clients with co-occurring disorders who  are attempting to navigate the criminal justice symptoms. We will provide education on these  issues as well as discuss institutional barriers that prevent them from reaching their goals.  Panelists will discuss how to best coordinate support for clients between these three roles to help Improve client outcomes. 

Objectives:

  1. Participants will gain awareness of the challenges faced by clients with co-occurring disorders Who are involved in the criminal justice system.
  2. Participants will develop tools to assist clients in building a unique perspective on their  situation to allow them to recognize, and acknowledge their individual needs
  3. Participants will reflect on best practices of supporting and prioritizing clients' needs effectively  with awareness of their legal, emotional, and chemical health concerns.

People who use drugs are more than their Drug use: A How to Guide for Harm Reduction, Interventions Across the Continuum of Care | Core Function: Client Education

Kyle Lipinski & Brit Culp, Hennepin Healthcare

 Have you ever advised a client on where to get a safer smoking kit during an assessment, knowing that they would likely have a 3 to 4-week wait before getting into treatment? Have you engaged clients who are considering leaving treatment about a safety plan for using after a period of abstinence? Have you ever stopped an assessment to ask a client who uses IV if they know what their resources are for support to access safer works? These interventions are the beginning steps towards recognizing positive change in our clients and are the building blocks of harm reduction. Harm reduction interventions can begin prior to clients obtaining a chemical health assessment, and can continue throughout treatment and aftercare. This presentation will discuss a variety of techniques that clinicians can use to improve their client's quality of life while promoting safety which can be enacted immediately. Participants will be asked in interactive activities and discussions throughout the presentation and will be encouraged to explore their own definitions of recovery and how this influences their work with clients interested in alternative recovery approaches.  

Objectives:

  1. Promote client health and overall quality of life 
  2. Expand knowledge of Harm Reduction Interventions 
  3. Resource sharing to promote access to up to date information and dispel myths related to substance use. 

Finishing the sentence: Addressing criminal thinking in substance use disorder treatment planning | Core Function: Counseling

Marina Fuhrman & Mary Brooks, MN Department of Corrections

The presentation will provide overview of criminal thinking errors and tactics, review clinical components specific to assessing a client with substance abuse issues and criminal behaviors. Discuss strategies of developing treatment planning and common treatment planning mistakes using complex case studies, including substance use, mental health, criminal thinking, cognitive impairment, health issues.

Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn about criminal thinking patterns and tactics, will be able to recognize interactions between criminal and addictive thinking.
  2. Based on the case studies attendees will discuss clinical process of assessing clients involved in criminal justice system
  3. Participants will Identify and discuss challenges related to the development of a comprehensive treatment planning with criminal offenders, males and females, with substance use issues.

Merging Narrative Therapy with Brain Science to Re-write and  Re-wire the Effects of Trauma | Core Function: Counseling

John Stillman, Caspersen Therapy and Training Center

Trauma can have crippling effects on people's lives, altering their identities and spiraling them into memories and emotions that can be all consuming. This workshop will focus on how the use of story, combined with an understanding of brain science, can help people re-connect with their values to reduce the effects of trauma.   John Stillman will present his use of narrative principles based on his book Narrative Therapy Trauma Manual (2010), and will show how narrative can incorporate and honor the strengths and initiatives of clients while also acknowledging their pain and struggles.  He will discuss how the latest advancements in neuroscience support the importance of the narrative to brain health.  This workshop will combine useful information with practical approaches to working with people affected by trauma.  Multiple teaching approaches such as lecture, case review, and live interviews will be used to make this a vibrant learning experience.   

Objectives:

  1. Understand the implications of trauma on the brain and memory.
  2. Identify the effects of trauma on the story of people's identities and how these are told.
  3. Explain how narrative therapy honors strengths and initiatives while acknowledging pain and struggle.
  4. Apply narrative therapy principles that are specifically useful to address trauma.
  5. Understand current research supporting these principles and practices.
  6. Explain the ways that brain science supports the importance of a person's narrative of their life.

A New Take on CBT: How to Teach Clients to Think Differently | Core Function: Client Education, Counseling

Ray Wolf, Riverplace Counseling Center

Goal: To teach and engage participants using a novel outlook on client education. The fundamentals of CBT and cognitive re-framing will be presented in a new and engaging way. Methods: Conceptualize cognitive re-framing using The Cores concept: Accountability, Validation, Gratitude, Not defined but refined, Not giving it away, and Road A vs. Road B. The acronym HABITS will also be used to define cognitive re-framing as it relates to recovery: Habitual, Automatic, Behavior (Learned), Intentional, Tenacious (Driven), and Satisfying. The overall presentation will outline how clinicians can teach clients to apply these methods of cognitive re-framing in a detailed, step-by-step manner. 

Objectives:

  1. To educate participants on The Cores and HABITS approach to cognitive re-framing, and how both concepts relate to addiction and recovery.
  2. To engage participants and help them apply The Cores and HABITS concepts to their own lives.
  3. To teach providers how to engage and educate clients using The Cores and HABITS concepts in their work.

 


11:30 am - 12:30 pm

Lunch


12:30 - 1:00 pm

Break & Exhibit Hall Viewing


1:00 - 3:00 pm

Breakout Sessions

Session Info

Executive Functioning Issues: What Are They and How Do I Help Clients With These Issues? | Core Function: Counseling

Amy Carrison, Autism Socient of Minnesota

Executive Functioning (EF) is a set of processes that allows an individual to plan, focus, remember things, and shift tasks.  Often Executive Functioning (EF) issues impact clients in areas such as planning, initiation of tasks and activities, emotion regulation, and response inhibition.  This presentation will discuss what executive functioning is, tools that can be used to screen deficits in executive functioning, and strategies clinicians can use with clients to help overcome these deficits.

Objectives:

  1. Recognize what executive functioning is and how it impacts clients and their daily functioning. 
  2. Demonstrate some techniques and tools that can be used with clients to help improve executive functioning.
  3. Discuss how executive functioning deficits can impact progress in treatment.

Developing Resiliency in Youth Exposed to Alcohol and Drugs in their Homes and Communities | Core Function: Human Diversity - Adolescents

Fred Dyer, Hope Recovery Center

Resilience refers to the process of overcoming the negative effects of risk exposure, coping successfully with traumatic, experiences, and avoiding the negative trajectories associated with risks. A key requirement of resilience is the presence of both risks and promotive factors that either help bring about a positive outcome or reduce or avoid a negative outcome. Resilience theory, though it is concerned with risk exposure among adolescents, is focused on strengths rather than deficits. It focuses on understanding healthy development in spite of risk.  The promotive factors that can help youth the negative effects of risks may be either assets or resources. Assets are positive factors that reside within the individual, such as competence, coping skills, self-efficiency. Resources include parental support, adult mentoring, or community organizations that promote environmental influences on adolescent health and development, helps place resilience theory in a more ecological context, and moves away from conceptualizations of resilience as a static, individual trait, It also stresses that external resources can be a focus of change to help adolescents face risks and prevent negative outcomes. 

Objectives:

  1. Cultivate 12 resiliency characteristics in adolescents exposed to alcohol and drugs in their homes and communities.   
  2. See resiliency for adolescents as a process and practice for overcoming the negative effects of risk exposure of alcohol and drugs in their home and communities. 
  3. Utilize 9 benefits of social emotional learning as a protective factor for adolescents exposed to alcohol and drugs in their homes and communities.

Creative Group Thearapy Engagement Skills/Activities that Increase Dopamine | Core Function: Counseling

Cathy Harvieux, ADAP Consulting/Care Crossings

Group Therapy: Engagement/Relationship Skill Building: In this workshop I will give participants as well as teach and practice my personally developed creative step by step, group therapy treatment engagement activities. (ie spirit pillows, "I am" cards,  thank you cards, scribble find it, recovery rocks, M & M's, accountability buddy, feelings dice, and much more) We will relate these activities to common substance abuse treatment plan goals, and how to document these engaging therapeutic group therapy activities.  Do not need to be an artist to attend, open to having a fun interactive experience is helpful.    

Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn step by step creative group therapy engagement activities. "learn today, apply tomorrow"
  2. Participants will learn alternative engaging methods to build client peer group support
  3. Participants will learn creative treatment planning methods to build engagement with treatment. 

Auspicious Meetings with Hmong and Karen Populations | Core Function: Human Diversity - Asia Pacific/Race

Nway Linn, Amherst H. Wilder

Southeast Asian Populations have had steady growth in the U.S., and specifically within Ramsey and Hennepin County. This learning opportunity is to provide support to other providers in the mental health and substance use fields. Various historical and cultural considerations will be provided. In addition, treatment approaches that adapt methods to incorporate cultural concepts and components to meet the unique needs of the Southeast Asian communities will be discussed. 

Objectives:

  1. To discuss lessons learned while treating co-occuring disorders in the Southeast Asian population.
  2. To increase awareness of the strengths and barriers within the Hmong and Karen communities.
  3. To identify various ways to faciilate learning and provide psychoeducation to Southeast Asian Populations.

Gaining the Edge on Compliance | Core Function: Ethics

Kristi Strang, DHS Licensing Division

An in depth exploration of the licensing requirements in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 245G from the perspective of DHS licensing staff.  This session is intended to help providers understand requirements in a way that will assist them in avoiding commonly issued violations.  DHS staff will share some of the more common areas of non-compliance with licensing requirements and will specifically explain the steps you can take to meet the requirements.  

Objectives:

  1. Inform providers of overlooked or misunderstood areas of Minnesota Statutes, chapter 245G.
  2. Assist providers to understand how to more completely meet the requirements in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 245G.
  3. To answer questions providers may have regarding the requirements in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 245G.

Therapeutic Community Treatment Model | Core Function: Treatment Planning

Jim Wynne & Nicole Frass, RS Eden

The training will be on how TC's use a Community/Family based treatment model of care to work with Drug Addiction and highly non-traditional/criminogenic/institutionalized clients.    

Objectives:

  1. Overview/History of a TC
  2. How Community and Family are incorporated into programming
  3. Challenging Behavior

Telehealth through Integrated Care in a CCBHC | Core Function: Assessment, Counseling

Shauna Reitmeier, Northwestern Mental Health Center & Jin Lee (Jinny) Palen, MACMHP

The state of Minnesota passed its comprehensive Telemedicine Act in 2014. More work continues to be done to promote and support the use of telemedicine across health care in Minnesota. Specifically, we will focus on building a telemedicine program for community-based mental and chemical health care in this Behavioral Health telemedicine "101." Presenters will offer an overview the state policy environment, opportunities, basics of setting up and delivering mental and chemical health care via telemedicine.     

Objectives:

  1. Understand the regulatory environment for delivering services via telemedicine
  2. Learn the basics of setting up a telemedicine program in a mental and chemical health setting, from equipment to internal agency policies.
  3. Learn about new opportunities and future places telemedicine is going in Minnesota and across the country.

 


3:00 - 3:30 pm

Break & Exhibit Hall Viewing


3:30 - 5:30 pm

Breakout Sessions

Session Info

To Thine Own Self be True | Core Function: Ethics

Rick Moldenhauer, DHS; Annette Pearson, Nystrom & Associates

With the advent of reimbursement for licensed professionals in private practice who meet the requirements of ADC counselor supervisors (245G.11 Subd 1 – 4) in Minnesota, this ethics presentation will focus on individual ADC ethics in private practice, vs. organization ethics in a licensed treatment program. Special attention will be paid to individual ADC ethical infractions and Statutory requirements and prohibitions for individual in private practice or considering private practice.

Objectives:

  1. Identify requirements for ADC private practice in Minnesota
  2. identify primary Statutory requirements and prohibitions for ADCs
  3. idetnify three most common ethical infractions by ADCs

Addiction and Attachment: How to connect with yourself and your clients on a deeper level | Core Function: Human Diversity - Disability, Co-Occuring

Julia Murtha, Planting Seeds Recovery

Secure attachment to a caregiver in early childhood gives us the ability to feel safe in the world, take risks and move toward others for support when we are suffering. When we miss this important part of development, it makes it incredibly difficult to develop close relationships, process difficult emotions, and move through life events. Insecure attachment can lead to deep isolation, emotional disconnection, confusion about where we fit in the community, and fear of not getting our basic needs met. People with insecure attachment often lean on chemicals to meet these needs.  As clinicians, we can use Attachment Theory to develop a deeper bond with our clients. This ultimately allows them to have a 'secure bases' to be able to explore their inner and outer worlds while in relationship. In this interactive presentation, you will walk away with a clear sense of your attachment style, how it may affect your client's ability to develop a therapeutic alliance, and ways you can shift your therapy process to connect more effectively with your clients. 

Objectives:

  1. Understand the 4 styles of attachment and how they affect relationships in adulthood
  2. Assess and observe attachment style in self (as clinician) and how it affects the therapeutic relationship
  3. Identify behaviors in clients that represent insecure attachment and ways to develop secure therapeutic attachment

SUD Reform in Action - Learn How Peer Support, Treatment Coordination & Teletherapy are Redefining Treatment as We Know it! | Core Function: Consulting with Other Professionals, Counseling

Justin Scharr, Roots Recovery/Minnesota CarePartner

A continuation of last year's standing-room only session "Opportunity Knocks: Utilizing Treatment Coordination, Peer Support and 245G SUD Reform to Revitalize the Treatment Continuum,"  this session allows a peek behind the curtain of SUD reform implementation, and real-world examples of how the new model of care is redefining treatment as we know it.  Minnesota 245G SUD reform has ushered in a long-awaited paradigm shift in the SUD treatment industry. The new services available under 245G, (Treatment Coordination, Peer Recovery Support) and new service delivery methods like teletherapy are revitalizing the treatment continuum and redefining the concept of "treatment."  Learn how new programs like Roots Recovery are blazing this new trail with remarkable success, and improving outcomes for clients and clinicians alike.  Learn about the novel and inspiring ways that Peer Recovery Support is being utilized to reach underserved populations, and to overcome significant barriers to care.  Discuss examples of how Treatment Coordination is connecting care pathways and integrating care, creating better outcomes for clients and allowing clinicians to focus their time and energy on clinical care.  Explore the untapped potential of telemedicine/teletherapy by hearing specific real-world examples of how it can be used to bridge the gap between points of care.  And most importantly, learn from those on the cutting edge of SUD reform how you and/or your program can take advantage of the new treatment paradigm and breathe new life into your treatment environment.  

Objectives:

  1. Learn about the novel and inspiring ways that Peer Recovery Support is being utilized to reach underserved populations, and to overcome significant barriers to care.
  2. Discuss examples of how Treatment Coordination is connecting care pathways and integrating care, creating better outcomes for clients and allowing clinicians to focus their time and energy on clinical care.
  3. And most importantly, learn from those on the cutting edge of SUD reform how you and/or your program can take advantage of the new treatment paradigm and breathe new life into your treatment environment. 

This is Your Brain on Drugs: The Complex Cognitive Neuroscience of Drug Addiction Simplified | Core Function: Treatment Planning

Mike Swenson, Beauterre Recovery Institute

Using PowerPoint visual aids, an interactive lecture, and some well-placed jokes, Mike Swenson, LADC, will give attendees a way to understand and simplify the complicated cognitive neuroscience of drug addiction. Attendees are given a way to understand and teach the complex interplay between thoughts, schemas/beliefs, and emotions from a cognitive psychology and evolution of behavior perspective. Attendees will then learn the mechanisms of habitual behaviors, and further, how those mechanisms are changed through substance abuse from a neuroscience perspective, and the feedback loops created in behavior from the aforementioned mechanisms. MARRCH attendees likely do not need more empathy towards addicts, but this presentation is a great way to increase ones understanding of the cognitive neuroscience of addiction, and could be a powerful tool to spread empathy and understanding of addiction to those outside of our profession, and battle the stigma our patients face.  

Objectives:

  1. Attendees are given a way to understand and teach the complex interplay between thoughts, schemas/beliefs, and emotions from a cognitive psychology and evolution of behavior perspective. 
  2. Attendees are familiarized with contemporary information about neuroscience related to the desensitization of the reward pathway, and the implications of that change to cognition, schemas/beliefs, and emotions and further, combined with Objective #1, the implications those changes have on the human experience of a person suffering from addiction.
  3. Attendees leave the session with a better understanding of the cognitive neuroscience of drug addiction, and have a template to use when teaching patients or members of the pubic specifically designed to increase empathy and understanding of addiction as a disease, regardless of the education or background of the individual, fighting back against the stigma of drug addiction and its harmful effects.

Locking up Criminal and Addictive Thinking | Core Function: Counseling

Angela Vatalaro & Tami Thon, MN Department of Corrections

During this session participants will learn about Criminal and Addictive Thinking Patterns, Distortions, and Tactics as defined in the A New Directions Curriculum.  Presenters will review the CBT approaches used in the DOC to assist clients in identifying, challenging, and replacing their distorted thought patterns that reinforce their substance use and criminality.  

Objectives:

  1. Define Criminal and Addictive Thinking Patterns, Distortions, and Tactics
  2. Review Thinking Reports and how clients can use them
  3. Provide ideas for how to facilitate clients' identifying, challenging, and replacing their criminal and addictive thinking

Transition from Prison to Community: The Needs of Individual's Being Released from Prison | Core Function: Consulting with Other Professionals

Mark Groves, MN Corrections Association; Alisha Lacina, MN Department of Corrections

Minnesota's prison population has grown from 2,000 in 1970 to more than 9800 this year. About 8,000 ex-offenders return to their communities this yearand arrive on the doorsteps of our communities. Studies show that approximately half will likely be rearrested within three years of release. The high volume of returnees is a reflection on the tremendous growth in the U.S. prison population during the past 30 years. For the communities to which most former prisoners return, the release of ex-offenders represents a variety of challenges.  What can be done to help people who are released from prison keep from being rearrested? With no job, no money, and no place to live, returnees often find themselves facing the same pressures and temptations that landed them in prison in the first place. Assisting ex-prisoners in finding and keeping employment, identifying transitional housing, and receiving mentoring are three key elements of successful re-entry into our communities.  This workshop will focus on their needs and what is currently being done before and after their release to address those needs. A panel of individuals from inside correctional institutions and community-based programs will discuss these issues and help you gain a deeper understanding of this population. We will explore best practices, and evidence-based initiatives to address what is needed for them to succeed when they return to the community.

Objectives:

  1. Participants will gain a deeper understanding of services offered in the Minnesota Correctional Facilities;
  2. Participants will gain a deeper understanding of the Transition from Prison to Community initiative and what the needs of ex-offenders are;
  3. Participants will gain a deeper understanding of Minnesota Correctional system and what offenders look like who are transitioning back to the community.

Telehealth in School based mental health | Core Function: Assessment, Counseling 

Janis Allen, Range Mental Health Center

Beginning with a grant initiative, RMHC partnered with a Nursing Student from Metropolitan State University and bought 13 iPads – three with Wifi – and 12 patients were recruited for the program. RMHC implemented the iPad program in September 2017. Vidyo was installed on computers in two outpatient offices as well as on the laptops of eight therapy providers, all of whom provided video-based virtual therapy to participating patients. RMHC expanded upon this program success and included it in its school-linked mental health initiative work. They offer school-based mental health services via telemedicine in partnership with their 13 school districts. https://www.vidyo.com/customers/healthcare/range-mental-health-center

Objectives:

  1. Learn about new opportunities in telemedicine and community mental and behavioral health 
  2. Learn models for offering school-based mental health services via telemedicine
  3. Understand the challenges and solutions for delivering care via telemedicine in school-based and home-based settings.

5:30 - 7:00 pm

EVENING EVENT | Awards Gala Dinner

More Info


Featured Speaker:

Beyond Stigma and Discrimination – A Patient Centered/Recovery Focused Future!

Justin Luke Riley, President/CEO of Young People in Recovery

 


Wednesday, October 30


7:00 am - 3:00 pm

Registration


8:00 - 9:00 am

FEATURED SPEAKER | Robert Weiss

More Info

Prodependence: Moving Beyond Codependency

Robert Weiss, PhD, MSW, Clinical Sexologist and Psychotherapist

The past 35 years have brought endless new, useful, and cutting edge treatments to the addiction space. During this time we have integrated all sorts of methods like: motivational interviewing, Smart Recovery, EMDR, trauma work, somatic and equine therapies, and more -- all to foster better outcomes for our addicted clients. But when it comes to the treatment of an addict’s partner and loved ones, we have seen little new thought since the concept of codependency was first fleshed out over three decades ago. Prodependence, the first attachment-based model for the treatment of addict’s partners and loved ones, moves beyond the trauma-based theories of codependency and co-addiction, allowing us to view this population with fresh eyes and fresh ideas. Prodependence as a model is more invitational, less pathological, and more personally affirming to those who are intimately involved with addicts, as Prodependence neither assumes nor assigns any pathology or label to people simply because they are loving an addict in the best way they can. 

Objectives:

  1. Introduce a new model of treatment (educate participants) for partners and families of addicts. 
  2. Attendees will be able to compare and contrast codependency and prodependency to understand the differences between the models. 
  3. Attendees will develop new skills to intervene on loved ones of addiction

 


9:00 - 9:30 am

Break & Exhibit Hall Viewing


9:30 - 11:30 am

Breakout Sessions

Session Info

New & Emerging Youth Chemicals | Core Function: Human Diversity - Adolescents, Race

Dan Becker, Saint Cloud Districk 742 Schools

Participants will see a display of over 400 new and emerging youth chemicals such as energy drinks and new synthetic drugs hidden in stash cans, mints, gums, nasal spray, soap, lotions and chews. The purpose of this display is visual recognition to help school security, faculty and staff recognize these chemicals.  Participants will also gain knowledge by participating in a Chemical Health classroom lecture regarding these new and emerging chemicals. How they effect the students brains, development, behavior and learning.

Objectives:

  1. Participants will gain knowledge of new and emerging youth chemicals through a display of over 400 samples.
  2. Participants will gain knowledge of an actual high school classroom lecture as a prevention tool.
  3. Participants will gain knowledge of how new synthetic drugs are impacting the Somali youth and Native American youth in central Minnesota.

Establishing Best Practices for the Implementation & Retention of Peer Recovery Support Services | Core Function: Documentation, Case Management

Melissa Evers, Wendy Jones, Kris Kelly, NUWAY

Presenters will share results of a 2019 dual-audience survey of Peer Recovery Support Services (PRSS) designed to assess the integration, effectiveness, and overall value of Peer Recovery Support Services in Minnesota. Peer Recovery Specialists and representatives of Rule 245G Treatment Providers will discuss successes, challenges, and misconceptions and collaborate to establish best practices in PRSS integration and retention.  

Objectives:

  1. Examine which Peer Recovery Support Services are and aren’t working from the perspective of Rule 245G Treatment Providers, and the Peer Recovery Specialists workforce.
  2. Decide best practices for PRSS integration and retention.
  3. Identify 3 reasonable actions/steps/tools for removing barriers to, and/or improving PRSS integration.

Current Events and Ethics in Behavioral Health | Core Function: Ethics

Carmen Finn, Recovering Hope; Kristin Williams, NUWAY

This session will explore current events and ethical implications for behavioral health.  This month alone there have been headlines related to big pharmacology and the opioid epidemic, states proposing laws that would charge pregnant women who use drugs with felonies, and states proposing safe injection sites.  This session will utilize a panel of professionals from the MARRCH Ethics Committee to explore these headlines and discuss the ethical implications for the field of behavioral health.

Objectives:

  1. The participant will be able to identify the ethical and legal implications of current events and headlines in behavioral health.
  2. The participant will gain knowledge of current events that may impact future work with clients, other professionals, and the behavioral health field.
  3. The participant will gain skills to discuss ethical dilemmas, articulate legal implications, and use of ethical consultation

Sex and Porn Addiction 101: The Basics

Robert Weiss PhD, LCSW

Often misunderstood and misdiagnosed, the problem of sexual addiction is one frequently presented by angry spouses who feel betrayed and men who have lost health, career and family-life goals to sexual acting out. This presentation by a well-known expert and author on sexual addiction treatment offers an overview of the questions and concerns most often asked by sex addicts (of all sexual orientations) and their spouses/partners. The material will offer a review of the diagnosis of sexual addiction, common behaviors and problems encountered by sex addicts along with direction toward eliminating problem sexual behavior. The relationship between sexual addiction and early trauma survival will be reviewed along with pertinent discussion about managing and pacing recovery in multiple related areas such as behavioral (additions) and emotional/relationship (intimacy problems). The influence of Internet based sex and porn on sexual addiction will be discussed. Participants will be offered a model of sex addiction recovery and healing –commonly utilized in treatment along with useful reading, 12-step and clinical referral information. 

Objectives:

  1. Attending professionals will learn the major psychological issues presented by men and women seeking help for repetitive patterns of relationship infidelity and sexual/romantic acting out.
  2. Attending professionals will be able to identify the three major signs of compulsive and addictive sexual behavior in non-offending adults.
  3. Participants will gain knowledge of basic referral resources and information including: Self-help groups, review of the 12 step programs, online resources and useful articles and books

What every addiction counselor should know about Disordered Gambling | Core Function: Diversity: Co-occuring

Susan Campion

This is an introduction for addiction counselors to learn to recognize the problem gambler.  This will include disordered gambling co-occurring with CD or MH, screening for problem gambling, and available resources for client’s and their families. 

Objectives:

  1. Learn to be aware of cross addiction to problem gambling in the CD population
  2. Gain a better understanding of the specific needs of the problem gambler
  3. Learn resources in the community for problem gamblers, their families, and how to become a state certified gambling counselor

CCBHC: The Evolution of Innovative Community Mental Healthcare | Core Function: Case Management, Counseling, Treatment Planning

Laura Vaughn, Northern Pines Mental Health Center; Jill Wiedermann-West, People Incorporated; Shauna Reitmeier, Northwestern Mental Health Center; Beth Krehbiel, Zumbro Valley Health Center; Pahoua Yang, Amherst H. Wilder Foundation; Jinn Lee Palen, MACMHP

This session will look at the complexity of supporting the most vulnerable people in our communities by dissecting the evolving work done by the CCBHC’s.  Minnesota healthcare thought leaders will go through what they have learned about converting siloed services to integrated services within their organizations and communities. They will discuss moving beyond the regulations and operations to a place of truly innovative care by giving success stories that highlight the work that is currently being done in Minnesota’s CCBHC model.  Through best practice examples they will show that effective deployment of an integrated model of service provides the best solution for higher quality, better value as well as better overall health outcomes.

Objectives:

  1. Understanding of CCBHC Organizational Change
  2. Understanding of CCBHC positive impact on client care
  3. How to properly build in an integrated services model of care to serve our communities complex needs
  4. Innovating to fill the Gaps in an incomplete system
  5. Building new outcomes

1-HOUR SESSION (9:30-10:30) | Increasing your odds for success: rolling tobacco into your work | Core Function: Treatment Planning

Meghan Brown, CentraCare; Sally Sales, Mental Health Resources

Tobacco remains the #1 cause of preventable death for the people we serve.  MN addiction professionals have been working together to tackle tobacco, and they have developed a free resource to help your organization address tobacco addiction.  Learn how to utilize your skills to support the people you serve to be 25% more successful in their recovery.  It's time we address tobacco, and SUD professionals have the knowledge and skills to make a difference!

Objectives:

  1. Identify myths and facts related to tobacco and other addictions
  2. Apply existing skills to treat tobacco addiction
  3. Understand resources available to integrate tobacco into your existing SUD program

 


11:30 am - 12:30 pm

Lunch


12:30 -1:00 pm

Break & Exhibit Hall Viewing


1:00 - 2:30 pm

Breakout Sessions

Session Info

A forgotten minority: Elders, Addiction and Opportunity | Core Function: Human Diversity - Elderly

Deidre Armstrong, The Retreat; Peter Oesterreich, Silver Sobriety

The three facilities in the Twin Cities working exclusively with elders and addiction will be discussing the state of addiction treatment in America today, the programs they have developed, and the individual, familial and societal challenges they have faced. Their successes and challenges will be addressed. They will discuss programatic adaptations that have proven to work with this population, and the barriers to treatment. 

Objectives:

  1. Present data on addiction treatment and the elderly population today.
  2. Present specific programmatic strategies that address the needs of the aging addict.
  3. Vision for the future and overcoming resistance- cultural, familial, personal. 

WHITE: intersections of feminism and privilege | Core Function: Human Diversity - Women

LynAnne Evenson, M Health Fairview

An experiential experience for professionals to examine how bias shows up in the therapy and treatment of patients and client of color.  An opportunity for professionals to learn and deconstruct harmful narratives that prevent intersectionality.

Objectives:

  1. will identify and learn how privilege shows up in the therapy
  2. will learn how "white" feminism protects the status quo
  3. will learn ways to deconstruct and transform current modes of thinking to become intersectional in thinking

Family-Centered System of Care Approach in Behavioral Health Treatment Setting | Core Function: Counseling

Carmen Finn & Sadie Hosley, Recovering Hope

This presentation will explore the intersection between substance use disorders and the family experience, impact of substance use on children, service delivery challenges, and improving outcomes through the use of family-centered systems of care.

Objectives:

  1. Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to define family centered care, including basic philosophy and strategies in substance use disorder treatment.
  2. Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to implement strategies towards father and partner involvement.
  3. Upon completion of this course, participants will able to describe how utilization of family-centered care improves behavioral health outcomes for the family.

Abstinence, Harm Reduction, and Moderate Consumption: The Recovery Odyssey | Core Function: Ethics

Jonathan Lofgren, Minneapolis College; Stephanie Devich, Valhalla Place

This session will be co-presented by SUD/COD professions with broad orientations that cover the spectrum of the topic, abstinence, harm reduction, and moderate consumption. Participants will hear about some of the latest research on abstinence and harm reduction based treatments with the intent of creating space for session participants to fully explore the theories (sometimes presented as competing opposites) and philosophies dominating the discourse about SUD & COD Treatments and Recovery Pathways. This exciting and charged-subject-matter session will include an in-depth discussion about Moderate Consumption and Abstinence Based Recovery.

Objectives:

  1. Review Recent Research and Practice Findings about Harm Reduction-based SUD/COD Treatments
  2. Review Recent Research and Practice Findings about Abstinence-based SUD/COD Treatmen
  3. Explore Personal and Professional Philosophy and Orientations about Abstinence, Harm Reduction, and Moderate Consumption based recovery programs

Creating Safe Space for Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Clients | Core Function: Human Diversity - Sexual Orientation

Marsha Partington, Club Recovery, LLC

This session will explore what it means to be a person identifying as Transgender or Gender Non-Conforming and the challenges faced by this population.  As professionals, examining our own internalized biases and cisgender privilege will help us to provide  respectful and affirming care.  Strategies will be discussed for creating safe clinical environments. 

Objectives:

  1. Participants will leave with ideas to make their professional spaces more welcoming.
  2. Develop understanding of challenges and barriers faced by the Transgender population in clinical environments
  3. Become familiar with appropriate language, questions and pronoun usage to enable respectful care

Schizoaffective Disorder for Co-occurring Disorders | Core Function: Human Diversity - Co-Occuring

Dr. Lois Schlutter

 

Client Learning Styles and Addiction Treatment | Core Function: Client Education, Counseling

Ben Stapp, MN Adult & Teen Challenge

Learning is an important and personal experience for all clients. It used to be assumed that everyone learned new material the same way, but over time research has discovered there are actually a number of learning styles and a variety of ways people process, retain and learn to apply information.  The more you know about these seven learning styles, the more prepared you will be to help your clients learn a new skill, concept, or shift in thinking.  This session will give you the tools and perspective to begin using techniques that utilize different learning styles in your practice.

Objectives:

  1. Particpants will be able to identify the seven learnign styles and determine their client's primary style.
  2. Particpants will understand learning style teaching techniques and best practices.
  3. Particpants will gain the ability to impliment client-centered techniques that reach a variety of learning styles into their current practice.

 


2:30 - 3:00 pm

Break & Exhibit Hall Viewing


3:00 - 4:00 pm

Breakout Sessions

Session Info

DBT for Dual Disorder Clients: The Science and the Practice | Core Function: Human Diversity - Co-Occuring

Lane Pederson, MHS

Keeping a dedicated focus on integrated treatment, this training covers the theory and practice of DBT along with explanations of DBT tools such as the diary card and behavioral analysis. Participants will leave encouraged and enthusiastic about how DBT can enhance their practice and the lives of their clients with co-occurring disorders.

Objectives:

  1. Describe the essential philosophies and interventions that comprise DBT, and list skills from the DBT skill modules
  2. Detail how dialectics and dialectical abstinence guide treatment
  3. Learn how the diary card and behavioral analysis transform treatment

Ethical and Multicultural Dilemmas in the use of Prayer in Addiction Counseling | Core Function: Ethics

Justin Thomas & Amy Evans, Hazelden Betty Ford Graduate School of Addiction Studies

Is the serenity prayer a microaggression? Ethical guidelines from the ACA and NAADAC Code of Ethics will be applied to the specific facilitation of the serenity prayer in addictions group counseling.  The addictions counselor has a unique role in the broader professional counselor identity.  Many counselors would consider the use of prayer in counseling to be a breach of our scope of competency. Others may consider it a value imposition or a boundary push into dual roles. However, spirituality in counseling and contemporary healthcare is researched to be associated with positive measured outcomes, especially in addictions treatment. Is the serenity prayer an evidence-based practice? How can informed consent be better implemented in order to make the use of prayer, spirituality, and recovery culture in addictions treatment more welcoming to the client? Case studies will be discussed and cultural sensitivity will be demonstrated as we delineate and deconstruct the meaning of prayer, God, and the multicultural implications of intersecting spiritual identities.

Objectives:

  1. Delineate ethical implications for using the serenity prayer in group counseling.
  2. Discuss multicultural implications in case studies on alienated clients due to the unannounced use of prayer. 
  3. Explore possible frameworks for spiritual informed consent in screening or orientation.

Neurospirituality:  the science and art of spiritual integration in co-occurring treatment | Core Function: Counseling

Tim Walsh, MN Adult & Teen Challenge

Neurospirituality is the integration of neuro-cognitive science on body and brain transformation and spiritual practices or disciplines.  Neurospirituality IS NOT a particular religious or denominational practice, though the Wisdom Traditions have incorporated many of these practices for millennia.  Spiritual integration is evidence-based, ethical, and responsive care to the spiritual needs of the client.  

Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to understand the practical and applied value of neuro-cognitive science to spiritual integration
  2. Participants will be able to incorporate examples of spiritual practices that are responsive to the client
  3. Participants will be provided the opportunity to appreciate the therapeutic value of spiritual integration, and the ethics of client-centered, cultural responsivity

Eating for Recovery: Client Nutrition Education for Treatment Center Providers | Core Function: Client Education

Nicki Zeidner, Melrose Center

Providing comprehensive nutrition education to clients has been shown to improve sobriety success rates.  Unfortunately, for both providers and clients alike, most treatment programs don’t have a dietitian on staff to provide this service.  Additionally, exposure to nutrition misinformation is common.  Adhering to the latest nutrition fad can cause more harm than help and even (re)trigger an eating disorder and/or lead to relapse.  To bridge this gap for treatment programs, nutrition experts at Melrose Center have developed a client video and education materials to help better support eating for recovery efforts.

Objectives:

  1. Participants will identify ways to evaluate the credibility of nutrition information. 
  2. Participants will be able to recognize how their own behaviors and attitudes about food, exercise, and body image can affect their clients.
  3. Participants will evaluate if Melrose Center nutrition education resources can be used at their treatment center to support client's recovery.

 


3:00 - 4:30 pm

Breakout Sessions

Session Info

The Intersection of HIV and Chemical Health | Core Function: Human Diversity - Sexual Preference

Megan Mueller & J. Heinz, JustUs Health

While Minnesota has low-moderate rates of new HIV diagnosis, there are significant disparities in who acquires HIV. We will explore the epidemiology of HIV in Minnesota and the ways that HIV risk is impacted when individuals engage in sex while using substances.

Objectives:

  1. Attendees will learn about how HIV is transmitted.
  2. Attendees will learn what substance use factors increase transmission risk for acquiring HIV.
  3. Attendees will learn about communities disproportionately impacted by HIV.

Opening the Door to Mental Health Services, including Addictions and Gambling, from within Primary Care Clinics | Core Function: Human Diversity - Co-Occuring

Tammy Reiff, Department of Veterans Affairs

Primary care settings have become a gateway for many individuals to obtain assistance for unmet behavioral health needs. Aiming to address these needs, many primary care providers are integrating behavioral health care services into their settings.  Multiple models have emerged, providing consultation, screening, and treatment. This presentation will review the SAMHSA and Department of Veterans Affairs models of primary care mental health integration and how this model can incorporate necessary screening and counseling within existing primary care clinics

Objectives:

  1. Understanding the Primary Care/Mental Health integration model
  2. Understand specific steps on how to integrate specialized Mental Health Care including addictions and  gambling services within an existing primary care clinic.
  3. Understand the positive impact of this program via case examples from an integrated VA Primary Care Mental Health clinic.

Understanding Suicide: Approaching suicidal clients within the context of addiction and early recovery | Core Function: Crisis Intervention and Counseling

Ann Schissel, Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

Suicidal ideation (SI) and behaviors are commonly seen in those struggling from active addiction and attempting to transition into early recovery.  This presentation will review data showing rates of SI in addiction and how chemical of choice influences suicidal thoughts and behaviors.  Additionally, data demonstrating the influence of racial, ethnic, and sexual minority status on SI will be discussed.  Moreover, recommendations for talking to those struggling with suicidal ideation and for identifying/implementing interventions promoting safety will also be reviewed.

Objectives:

  1. Attendees will be able to understand how certain marginalized populations' risk for suicide varies.
  2. Attendees will be able to identify the core questions for conducting a risk assessment with clients
  3. Attendees will be able to identify and implement a safety plan

 


4:00 - 5:00 pm

Breakout Sessions

Session Info

What Works for Mothers in Recovery: Outcomes and Lessons learned from the DHS Women's Recovery Services Initiative | Core Function: Human Diversity - Women

Michelle Gerrard & Monica Idzellis Rothe, Wilder Research

This session provides results of a comprehensive 5-year evaluation of 12 programs providing treatment and recovery services to nearly 3,000 pregnant and parenting women across Minnesota. Through this Department of Human Services initiative, known as Women's Recovery Services, grantee programs provide gender-specific, family-centered services for the clients in their care. Wilder Research collected comprehensive data about clients served, services provided, and short and long-term outcomes for women in recovery, including conducting follow-up interviews with clients 6- and 12-months after leaving the program. Program staff collected and documented information about clients and their children at intake, closing, and throughout their participation in the program in a common database system. We will share information about client outcomes, and discuss key factors contributing to success in serving this population.

Objectives:

  1. Attendees will have increased knowledge of the outcomes achieved by a comprehensive case-management program serving women in recovery
  2. Attendees will have increased knowledge of what program factors improve outcomes of women in recovery
  3. Attendees will have an overview of feedback from women about what helps them maintain their sobriety

Pain and Opioids | Core Function: Human Diversity - Disability (Chronic Pain)

Bret Haake, HealthPartners

Defining the opioid epidemic and its impact. Describing how the opioid epidemic started and how to get out of it. Lastly, the origins of pain and how to better treat it.  

Objectives:

  1. Understand how the opioid epidemic started and how extensive it is.
  2. Better understanding of pain and how it can be treated
  3. What is being done to improve pain treatment and decrease the use of opioids. 

Peer Recovery Specialists and Supervision Panel | Core Function: Consulting with Other Professionals

Dana Nelson, State of Minnesota

This will be a panel discussion with peer specialists and their supervisors sharing experiences of implementing the work in clinical settings.

Objective:

  1. To provide real life examples of peer support in practice.
  2. To allow for discussion and problem solving of peer support services
  3. To allow for discussion related to supervision and requirements 

Does Drug Treatment Court Work: A Judicial Perspective  | Core Function: Consulting with Other Professionals

Christian Wilton, Scott County Judge

I will explore the inner workings of drug treatment court including what works and what does not.  I will talk about the high risk/high need requirement for entry into treatment court.  I will cover the 5 phases, MAT, incentives and consequences, the importance of a psychologist, law enforcement and providers.  I will share stories of our participants and where they started.  I will talk about the impetus for our drug court.  You can google Jennifer Griffith and my name to see the impetus.  I am happy to do a 60 or 90 minute presentation.  

Objectives:

  1. to provide a background on the current drug trade and overdose statistics and the need for drug courts
  2. to provide knowledge of the inner working of a drug court and dealing with participants with co-occurring diagnosis
  3. to provide information about what works and what does not including MAT

 


4:30 - 5:30 pm

Breakout Sessions

Session Info

Fast-Tracker: A Resource for Finding SUD Service Openings | Core Function: Referral

Cindy Swan-Henderlite, MN DHS Behavioral Health Division; Linda Vukelich, Minnesota Mental Health Community Foundation

A live demonstration of how to use the Fast-Tracker site, a next-level collaboration bringing the community together to meet needs and improve access while giving individuals, families, and providers the tools needed to be successful. A link to a step-by-step users guide will be provided.  The presentation will show how to search for licensed SUD treatment and detox openings, and how to find mental health resources registered on the site. 

Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn how to search and use the Fast-Tracker site
  2. Participants will learn about the variety of resources on the site
  3. Participants will learn how to register on FT and update a program profile

PTSD and Opioid Use Disorder: Diagnosis and Effective Interventions | Core Function: Human Diversity - Co-Occuring

John Sutherland, Allina Health

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a serious and debilitating disorder which is estimated to affect as much as 14% of the general population and upwards of 70% of the military population (Solomon, 2001).  One out of eight service members returning from operations in Iraq screened positive for PTSD (Dabbs, Watkins, Fink, Cost, & Millikan, 2014). Substance use disorders are often associated with PTSD. According to Chilcoat & Breslau, 1998, 34% of those individuals receiving substance use treatment also carry a PTSD diagnosis with 'hard drugs' such as cocaine and opiates being the drug of choice.  From 2001 to 2008, prescription drug abuse rose from 1% to 10%. Even higher rates were revealed from 2007 to 2010 showing a 700% increase in opiate use (Dabbs, Watkins, Fink, Cost & Millikan, 2014).  Another long withstanding association with Co-morbid PTSD and Opioid usage is the high suicide risk (Shorter, Hsieh, & Kosten, 2015). This session will review the diagnosis of co-morbid PTSD and Opioid Use Disorder as well as effective interventions for both disorders. 

Objectives:

  1. Understand the diagnosis of PTSD and Opioid Use Disorder and the intersection of the two diagnosis. 
  2. List the factors that maintain PTSD such as Avoidance in the form of Opioid Use Disorder
  3. Provide knowledge of the evidenced based treatments for PTSD and Opioid Use Disorder

Managing the Pregnant Patient with OUD: Where Care and Coordination Converge | Core Function: Human Diversity - Women

Tim Hernandez, Entira Family Clinics

In this session we will use a case study of managing a pregnant woman with co-existing OUD to demonstrate not only the complexities of care and coordination of care in this setting. We will examine the medical, social, and legal aspects of providing care to pregnant women who have SUD and why family physicians are in a perfect position to help provide this care.

Objectives:

  1. Understanding the medical, legal and social complexities of SUD and pregnancy
  2. Understanding the importance of coordinating multiple disciplines to provide excellent care for the mother and child
  3. Demonstrate the value that family physicians bring to pregnant women who have SUD

 


5:30 pm

Conference Concludes


 

 

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